Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Reader Rabbit Recommends: Rin Tin Tin


maggie the reader rabbit

Join our Adult Summer Reading program, and Paws to Read along with Maggie. Maggie is not only a wonderful pet, she loves to sink her teeth into a good book.  

This week Maggie (our Reader Rabbit) recommends:




Rin Tin Tin: the Life and the Legend

By Susan Orlean
Non-Fiction, 2nd floor, 636.7376 Orlean
Large Type, 2nd floor, LT 636.7376 Orlean


Corporal Lee Duncan returned to California from the battlefield in France in 1918 with a German shepherd puppy who he named Rin Tin Tin .He thought his dog was very talented and trained him for the burgeoning motion picture business. Rin Tin Tin and his descendants became box office stars in both silents and talkies. TV’s Adventures of Rin Tin Tin introduced “Rinty” to baby boomers and continued on in reruns, creating a new audience for this American icon. Author Susan Orlean covers it all-obedience training, dog breeding, dogs in entertainment, dogs in war and the amazing bond between Duncan and Rin Tin Tin that grew into an veritable industry.     

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Reader Rabbit Recommends: A Street Cat Named Bob


maggie the reader rabbit

Join our Adult Summer Reading program, and Paws to Read along with Maggie. Maggie is not only a wonderful pet, she loves to sink her teeth into a good book.  

This week Maggie (our Reader Rabbit) recommends:





A Street Cat Named Bob: And How He Saved My Life

By James Bowen
Non-Fiction, 2nd floor, 636.8009 Bowen 

Struggling street musician James Bowen takes responsibility for an injured ginger tomcat whom he befriends and names Bob. Bob’s sores heal; Bob chooses stays with Bowen, curling up in his guitar case while Bowen busks in Covent Garden.  As their relationship grows, the bond between cat and protector allows Bowen to leave his drug use for good and get on to a life beyond busking. Check out  Youtube for interviews with Bowen and to see Bob in action.

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

Reader Rabbit Recommends: Into Darkness


maggie the reader rabbit

Join our Adult Summer Reading program, and Paws to Read along with Maggie. Maggie is not only a wonderful pet, she loves to sink her teeth into a good book.  

This week Maggie (our Reader Rabbit) recommends:



Into Darkness

By Jonathan Lewis
Non-Fiction, 2nd floor, 636.7092 Kerasote

In “Into Darkness, Suzy is the guide-dog for the blind victim and the only witness to his death but she can’t talk  -  or can she?    DCI Nick Bale and dog-handler Kate Baker take some unusual measures to solve this case.  In Lewis’ second in the series, “Into Dust”, an IED-sniffing dog helps solve the murder of a high government official in England.  Much of the action takes place in Afghanistan, with Nick and Kate shuttling back and forth.  Both titles have the flavor of Reginald Hill and his Pascoe/Dalziel series.

Tuesday, July 01, 2014

Reader Rabbit Recommends: Merle's Door


maggie the reader rabbit

Join our Adult Summer Reading program, and Paws to Read along with Maggie. Maggie is not only a wonderful pet, she loves to sink her teeth into a good book.  

This week Maggie (our Reader Rabbit) recommends:

Merle’s door: Lessons from a freethinking dog

By Ted Kerasote
Non-Fiction, 2nd floor, 636.7092 Kerasote

Nature/adventure writer Ted Kerasote was on a camping trip in the desert when a large young stray dog appeared and claimed Ted as his own. Kerasote named him Merle: the book’s title refers to the door Kerasote made in their Wyoming home so that Merle could come and go as he chose. The town was small with not many fences or cars so Merle was free to roam, socialize and bond with dogs and townspeople alike. Having Merle in his life led Kerasote to research the canine species as well as dog/human interaction; he intersperses these facts with Merle’s story. Merle and Kerasote hunted, skied and hiked, not as master and dog but as true partners in a blessed human/canine relationship. One wishes all dogs could be so lucky. 

See Spot Guard!



Close to 100 people came out last Saturday to see police dog Odin from the Mountain View Police Department.

Odin was accompanied by his handler Office Doreen Hansen and Sergeant Saul Jaeger. Odin is a German shepard and is about 2.5 years old. He has been working for the police department for about a year and in that time has been responsible for 9 apprehensions! His handler Officer Hansen is responsible for his care and training, and Odin lives with her. Sergeant Jaeger called Officer Hansen a real-life dog whisperer. He also said that she is not only the most senior patrol officer on the force but is also the most senior handler. Odin has received extensive training for his job, which continues once a week on a regular basis.

Those who wanted were able to say hi and give Odin a pat.

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Reader Rabbit Recommends: Dewey by Vicki Myron



maggie the reader rabbit

Join our Adult Summer Reading program, and Paws to Read along with Maggie. Maggie is not only a wonderful pet, she loves to sink her teeth into a good book.  

This week Maggie (our Reader Rabbit) recommends:


http://encore.mountainview.gov/iii/encore/record/C__Rb1357809__Sdewey%20the%20library%20cat__Orightresult__X2?lang=eng&suite=cobaltDewey: the small-town library cat who touched the world

By Vicki Myron
Non-Fiction, 2nd floor, 636.8092 Myron
 
Librarians share stories about all the interesting things left behind in library book return slots, but one of the most interesting happened in Spencer, Iowa. On a frightfully cold night, someone stuffed a small kitten in the book return slot at the Spencer Public Library. Library Director Vicki Myron took him in and he was appropriately named Dewey Readmore Books. He became a beloved fixture in the library, charming the people of Spencer for 19 years as the beloved library mascot.

Reader Rabbit Recommends: Green Porno by Isabella Rossellini



maggie the reader rabbit

Join our Adult Summer Reading program, and Paws to Read along with Maggie. Maggie is not only a wonderful pet, she loves to sink her teeth into a good book.  

This week Maggie (our Reader Rabbit) recommends:


Green Porno: A Book and Short Films

By Isabella Rossellini
Non-Fiction, 2nd floor, 591.562 Rossellini
 
Based on a series of short environmental films created by Isabella Rossellini, Green Porno is both ridiculous and seductive. In a series of short vignettes that use puppetry and Rossellini's own body, Green Porno describes the bizarre yet totally real sexual practices of seven marine animals. The book provides the opportunity for a closer look at Rossellini's homemade costumes and to contemplate the simplicity of her prose; the short films are collected on an accompanying DVD. It is not only my rabbit's proclivities that lead me to recommend this book, it's truly an excellent artistic work.

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Reader Rabbit Recommends: Wesley the Owl by Stacey O'Brien


maggie the reader rabbit

Join our Adult Summer Reading program, and Paws to Read along with Maggie. Maggie is not only a wonderful pet, she loves to sink her teeth into a good book.  

This week Maggie (our Reader Rabbit) recommends:

Wesley the Owl: the remarkable love story of an owl and his girl

By Stacey O'Brien 
Non-Fiction, 2nd floor, 598.97 O’Brien

Biologist and owl expert Stacey O’Brien writes about how she rescued an abandoned 4-day-old baby barn owl and describes their amazing life together.  Because he had nerve damage in one wing, he would never be able to live in the wild, so she took care of him for the rest of his life.  Through the story we learn about some of the strange habits of owls, like their mice-only diet which required Stacey to buy mice in bulk, and also their intelligence, loyalty, and protective natures.  This is an amazing story of the strong bond between an owl and a human that lasted 19 years.


Wednesday, June 11, 2014

What we are reading now... Fashion Sense Edition

Lost art of dress by Linda Przybyszewski (746.92 Przybyszewski)

Do you watch old movies from the 30’s, 40’s and 50’s just for the clothes? “Lost art of dress” gives you a glimpse into the background for those clothes. Illustrations from catalogs, magazines and pattern books enliven the text as the author traces the social history of twentieth century American women’s lives through their clothing.   
The science of home economics flourished until the 1960’s -teachers sought to introduce principles of harmony, balance and proportion to their students’ creations.  Rules abounded-what colors were appropriate and when. Different activities required different clothing: school, work, travel, housework, sports, afternoon wear and formal wear-all had their own kind of clothing with very little crossover.  Przybyszewski covers hobble skirts, shirtwaists, foundation garments, the advent of slacks, miniskirts, the “Color me beautiful “ rage and the impact of consumerism on quality and taste in the past one hundred years.


In this age of anything goes, the author feels that we have lost things in the process.  I don’t agree with everything she says, but she has some valid points: the Seventies were indeed the Dark Ages of Fashion and women look better in a good design that’s age-appropriate. She is a firm believer in Less is more-invest in a few good pieces; add accessories to change the look without breaking the bank.   




I bought a pair of leather tennis shoes with discreet studs-I thought I was really cool; then I came across “Sneakers: the complete limited editions guide”. This is really cool- limited edition sneaker history in vivid color. What fun to look at even if you can’t own the shoes.  Adidas, Asics, Nike, Converse, New Balance, Vans, Reeboks, Pumas, Air Jordans and other brands are shown with wonderfully detailed photographs and back histories of collaborations among artists, shoe manufacturers and retail stores internationally. Sneaker anatomy and technical glossary are included for those seekers of further sneaker knowledge.